Outreach Partner: Southwest Alternate Media Project (SWAMP)

Kartemquin Films has been a collaborative Chicago-based center for documentary media makers for over 48 years, seeking to foster a more engaged and empowered society. Kartemquin is recognized internationally for crafting quality documentaries, such as Hoop Dreams and The Interrupters, backed by audience and community engagement strategies, and for its innovative media arts community programs. The tribute will feature screenings of Golub by Gordon Quinn; Almost There, on an outsider artist, with guest filmmaker Dan Rybicky; On Beauty, Joanna Rudnick’s acclaimed 30-minute film on a fashion photographer who challenges the industry’s definition of female beauty; and a panel on Kartemquin and documentary activism with Patricia Aufderheide, cosponsored with SWAMP.

Patricia Aufderheide will also give a talk titled “Can Fair Use Help the Visual Arts Community?” on Monday, November 16, at 5 P.M., at Rice Media Center where she will be joined by Gordon Quinn as a respondent. Quinn was one of the leaders of the movement to clarify artists’ fair use rights; one of the creators of the Documentary Filmmakers’ Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use in 2005; and one of its champions since. On the panel following Professor Aufderheide’s presentation, Quinn will talk about the effect of having such a code on the community of documentary filmmakers.

Gordon Quinn

Gordon QuinnGordon Quinn, Artistic Director and founding member of Kartemquin Films, has been making cinéma vérité films that investigate and critique society by documenting the unfolding lives of real people for over 45 years.

Roger Ebert, of the Chicago Sun-Times, called Quinn’s first film, Home for Life (1966), “an extraordinarily moving documentary.” At Kartemquin, Gordon created a legacy that is an inspiration for young filmmakers and a home where they can make high quality documentaries about social issues. Kartemquin’s best-known film, Hoop Dreams (1994), executive produced by Gordon, was released theatrically to unprecedented critical acclaim. In the role of director, he recently completed Prisoner of Her Past, about a Holocaust survivor suffering from delayed-onset post-traumatic stress disorder, and co-directed A Good Man, a documentary about Bill T. Jones, an acclaimed artistic director, choreographer, and dancer.

Patricia Aufderheide

patriciaresizedPatricia Aufderheide is a Professor of Communication Studies at American University in Washington, D.C., and founder of the Center for Media & Social Impact. Her books include Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back in Copyright with Peter Jaszi and Documentary: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford). Aufderheide has received numerous journalism and scholarly awards, including the George Stoney award for service to documentary from the University Film and Video Association in 2015 and a Woman of Vision award from Women in Film and Video, D.C., in 2010.


PROGRAMS

GolubGOLUB
with Gordon Quinn
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1:10 P.M.
SUNDANCE CINEMAS
view more info


VISIONARY STORYTELLING: THE KARTEMQUIN SENSIBILITY
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 4:00 P.M., FREE
RICE MEDIA CENTER
view more info

From the start, Kartemquin was infused with a commitment to storytelling that honors the complexity of the subject and the audience’s ability to engage with it. In this panel, the founder of the legendary media arts organization joins with Kartemquin filmmakers Gordon Quinn (Golub) and Dan Rybicky (Almost There) and board member Patricia Aufderheide to discuss Kartemquin’s approach to depicting the social conditions and commitment of artists. The panel will include a screening of Joanna Rudnick’s Kartemquin film On Beauty (2014, 31 min.) about Rick Guidotti, a fashion photographer who redirects his attention to capturing the beauty of people with disabilities.


Almost ThereALMOST THERE
with Dan Rybicky
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 7:30 P.M.
SUNDANCE CINEMAS
view more info


CAN FAIR USE HELP THE VISUAL ARTS?
with Patricia Aufderheide and Gordon Quinn
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 5:00 P.M., FREE
RICE MEDIA CENTER
view more info

The talk and panel will discuss the new Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts just created by and for the visual arts community – artists, museum curators, archives managers, art historians, and studio and art history teachers and scholars. The copyright doctrine of fair use, which permits use of unlicensed copyrighted material, has great utility in the visual arts. The newly created Code, produced by the College Art Association, makes it much easier to employ fair use to do visual arts scholarship, art practice, teaching, exhibitions, digital displays, and more. Professor Aufderheide, one of the lead facilitators of the Code, will explain how it works, how it was created, and why it’s reliable. She will be joined by Gordon Quinn and other respondents.