THROUGH THE REPELLENT FENCE: A LAND ART FILM

Sam Wainwright Douglas is a Houston-raised director and editor working in Austin, TX. Recently, Sam co-directed and edited Honky Tonk Heaven, which won an audience award at South by Southwest 2016 and opened the 2016 Houston Cinema Arts Festival. He directed Citizen Architect: Samuel Mockbee and the Spirit of the Rural Studio, which was broadcast nationwide on PBS in 2010, and co-directed The Holy Modal Rounders… Bound to Lose (2006). As an editor, he has cut countless hours of television for PBS, HBO, A&E, the Discovery Channel, the History Channel and the Food Network.

Interdisciplinary arts collective Postcommodity is comprised of Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez and Kade L. Twist, three Native American artists who put land art in a tribal context. Postcommodity works to forge new metaphors capable of rationalizing our shared experiences within the increasingly challenging contemporary environment; promote a constructive discourse that challenges the social, political, and economic processes that are destabilizing communities and geographies; and connect indigenous narratives of cultural self-determination with the broader public sphere.

Sam Wainwright Douglas
Through the Repellent Fence: A Land Art Film
Saturday, November 11, 1:00 PM
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston


Ash: The Art of Wayne Gilbert and Jesse Lott: Artist in Action

Director Wayne Slaten is an award-winning American independent movie producer, director, screenwriter, cinematographer, and editor. His films include the thriller Cold War (2011), which was screened as part of Cannes Court Métrage in 2012. Slaten wrote and directed his first feature length movie Backroad in 2012 and directed the spy-thriller Osprey (2017) starring Eric Roberts and Navid Negahban. Slaten’s short film Red Pearl (2015) won the NASA Jury Award in the CineSpace film competition and screened aboard the International Space Station before airing on PBS in 2016. Slaten is presenting the world premiere of Ash: The Art of Wayne Gilbert in HCAF2017.

Artist Wayne Gilbert is an extremely versatile artist, who has created a novel approach to the process of making art from the vantage point of the narrow line between life and death. The material from which he creates his pigments is the unclaimed ashes of the dead that he collects from mortuaries. The result is his strangely beautiful and powerfully charged works of art that communicate solemn pieties and spiritual emotions. Gilbert has an undergraduate degree from the University of Houston in Painting, and a Masters from Rice University. He was a founding member of the Rubber Group in 1996, and in 2001 Wayne founded the 101 Space in downtown Houston, where he presented new and eclectic exhibitions until 2007 when he opened Ggallery. Wayne has had many solo and group exhibitions nationally and internationally.

Director Cressandra Thibodeaux moved to Houston in 1981 and attended the High School for Performing and Visual Arts, majoring in dance. She toured with Texas Ballet and received a full scholarship to attend the University of Texas. In 1997, Ms. Thibodeaux received her M.F.A. from Columbia University’s film program. Since then she has directed several award-winning commercials, a few short films, documentaries, and one feature film. Moreover, Thibodeaux has received numerous awards and grants for her writing. Presently, Thibodeaux is the Executive Director of 14 Pews Art House, located in Houston, Texas.

Artist Jesse Lott is an African American Houston-based artist, who is known for his visionary wire sculpture, paper figures, and works on paper made using found materials. Lott is one of Texas’ most respected artists and has exhibited in major museums and universities in Texas and throughout the South. His art has also been shown at the Studio Museum in Harlem and the Alternative Museum in New York. For the past forty years, his work has been grounded in an approach to art that he calls Urban Frontier Art, which involves the recycling of discarded urban material into art. His signature sculptural aesthetic reflects a sophisticated grasp of folk art and often depicts a cast of characters including mythological beings, heroes, and ordinary people, as a way to explore the many complex dimensions of being human (Harithas, 1999).

Wayne Slaten
Ash: the Art of Wayne Gilbert
Cressandra Thibodeaux
Jesse Lott: Artist in Action
Sunday, November 12, 4:00 PM
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston


A Life in Waves

Writer / editor Bradford Thomason and director Brett Whitcomb are award-winning filmmakers from Houston, Texas. Their credits include The Rock-afire Explosion (2008); GLOW: The Story of the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling (2012); County Fair, Texas (2015). GLOW premiered at Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival in 2012, and was awarded Best Documentary at Comic-Con International Independent Film Festival. Most recently, Brett and Bradford served as producer and director of photography, respectively, on the 10-part docu-series, QB1: Beyond the Lights, which aired on Verizon’s newly launched go90 platform. 

Artist Suzanne Ciani is a composer, recording artist, and pioneer in the field of electronic music and sound design. While at the University of California at Berkeley, Suzanne fell under the spell of the synthesizer designer Don Buchla and set her course for electronic music. She is best loved for her fifteen albums of original music, which feature her performances in a broad array of expressions: pure electronic, solo piano, piano with orchestra, and piano with jazz ensemble.

Bradford Thomason
A Life in Waves
Sunday, November 12, 1:00 PM
Rice Media Center